FishyTalk

Shrimp Exports: India turns world No 1 in 2016 – Financial Express

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Shrimp Exports: India turns world No 1 in 2016

Seafood exports from the country hit an all-time high last fiscal with the total revenue touching $5.78 billion, or Rs 37,870.90 crore, by exporting 11,34,948 tonne seafood products, largely due to a robust demand for frozen shrimp and fish.


By:  | Kochi | Published: August 24, 2017 3:48 AM

India is the second-largest fish producer in the world after China and accounts for nearly 6% of global fish production.

India claimed the top spot in shrimp exports to the global market in 2016 with an unprecedented 14.5% growth over the previous year, according to a trade report by FAO’s Globefish, which is responsible for information and analysis on international fish trade and markets. The report says that India also achieved the distinction of 130% growth in the exports of value-added shrimp, growing from 10,100 tonne in 2015 to 23,400 tonne in 2016, mostly directed to the US market. India is the second-largest fish producer in the world after China and accounts for nearly 6% of global fish production. Seafood exports from the country hit an all-time high last fiscal with the total revenue touching $5.78 billion, or Rs 37,870.90 crore, by exporting 11,34,948 tonne seafood products, largely due to a robust demand for frozen shrimp and fish. According to Globefish, the top five shrimp exporters to the international market in 2016 were India (438,500 tonne, +14.5%), Vietnam (425,000 tonne, +18–20 %), Ecuador (372,600 tonne, +7.8%), Indonesia (220,000 tonne, +21%) and Thailand (209,400 tonne, +22%). India’s top export markets include the US, Vietnam, the EU and Japan. Indian seafood exports to the US is seen recouping its losses suffered due to the punitive tariff imposed by US department of commerce (USDOC) in 2004 with the help of higher production of vannamei shrimp, which is cheaper than the traditional black tiger.

Seafood exports to the European Union and South Africa have also come under intense scrutiny in the recent past. The EU commission has passed a motion to increase the number of shipments of Indian aquaculture products stopped for checks at the borders to 50% from 10 % earlier. On the global demand for shrimp, the reports says that US, EU and Japanese markets showed a moderate growth. Strong demand was reported from China due to decline in domestic production. International prices remained stable throughout 2016. “Mixed production trends for farmed shrimp were observed in Asian producing countries during 2016, with a total estimated production of around 2.5 million tonne. While disease remained a major concern, adverse weather conditions also had impacts on production, particularly during the first half of the year. Fortunately, supplies recovered in India, Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand during the second half of 2016,” the report said.

International prices for shrimp remained stable throughout 2016. “In terms of prices, vannamei shrimp prices increased marginally during 2016. In the single-largest import market, the US, there was a 5.5% rise in import prices compared with 2015. US prices for Indian shrimp and Ecuadorean shrimp increased 2.7% and 7.8% respectively,” the report said. Year-on-year imports increased significantly in Vietnam, China, the Republic of Korea and Hong Kong.

Courtesy- http://www.financialexpress.com/economy/

Health effects of seafood

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Seafood is a natural part of a balanced diet. It contains high levels of several important nutrients ( and thus helps us maintain a good nutritional status, important for our health).

The importance of diet

Obesity and other lifestyle-related diseases are increasing in the western world. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has estimated that 80 per cent of cardiac infarctions, 90 per cent of diabetes type 2 and 30 per cent of cancer occurrences could be prevented with better diets, regular physical activity and not smoking. In Europe, more than 70 per cent of the most important risk factors associated with non-communicable diseases are related to our diet. These diseases are closely related to excess weight gain partly due to a high intake of e.g. sugar and energy dense foods , highlighting the importance of a healthy diet.

A varied and healthy diet is a prerequisite for good health. Fish and other seafood are an important part of a balanced diet and contribute to a good nutritional status. The Norwegian health authorities’ general recommendation is to increase the consumption of fish, both for dinner and as spread. This recommendation applies especially to those who currently eat no or very little fish as part of their diet. Children, young people, pregnant women in particular eat little fish. A good nutritional status is especially important for these vulnerable groups. Seafood contains high levels of many important nutrients that are not commonly found in other foods. It is an excellent source of proteins, very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA), vitamin D, selenium and iodine. Fatty fish and certain fatty seafood products have the highest level of marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D in our diet.

Good for your heart health

We know quite a lot about the health effects of isolated nutrients present in fish, but less about the combined effects of nutrients in fish, i.e. how fish as food contribute to promote and maintain good health.. So far the documented beneficial effects of a high intake of fish are mainly related to the content of EPA and DHA, which make the veins more elastic, prevent blood clots, reduce blood pressure, stabilise heart rhythm and generally reduce the risk of a heart attack.

Good for your heart health

We know quite a lot about the health effects of isolated nutrients present in fish, but less about the combined effects of nutrients in fish, i.e. how fish as food contribute to promote and maintain good health.. So far the documented beneficial effects of a high intake of fish are mainly related to the content of EPA and DHA, which make the veins more elastic, prevent blood clots, reduce blood pressure, stabilise heart rhythm and generally reduce the risk of a heart attack.

Other health effect from seafood

Epidemiological studies have shown an association between seafood consumption and a lower prevalence of depression. This indicates that consuming seafood result in lower risk of depression. Consumption of fish and other seafood is also important during pregnancy and foetal development, including foetus growth and neurobiological development.Most studies have involved pure fish oil or capsules containing various fish oils or pure EPA and DHA. By contrast, very few intervention studies have explored the health effects of a regular intake of fish and other seafood. Hence NIFES aims to study the overall health effects of seafood intake in relation to obesity, diabetes type 2 and mental health.

Courtesy: http://www.fisheries.no/